Progressive Calendar 05.06.10
From: David Shove (shove001tc.umn.edu)
Date: Thu, 6 May 2010 16:31:35 -0700 (PDT)
           P R O G R E S S I V E   C A L E N D A R   05.06.10
                  BOYCOTT BP - PUT IT OUT OF BUSINESS

1. End US torture/f 5.06 7pm
2. Vs free trade/f  5.06 7pm
3. Mexican/art/rev  5.06 7pm
4. Shadow theater   5.06 8:30pm

5. Unallotment      5.07 8am
6. Dirty oil        5.07 11am
7. Cinco de Mayo    5.07 4pm
8. Palestine vigil  5.07 4:15pm
9. Joe Hill/film    5.07 7pm

10. Amy Goodman - BP: Billionaire Polluter

--------1 of 10--------

From: Women Against Military Madness <wamm [at] mtn.org>
Subject: End US torture/f 5.06 7pm

Film Screening and Discussion: "Ending U.S.-Sponsored Torture Forever"
Thursday, May 6, 7:00 p.m. St. Joan of Arc Church, Hospitality Hall, 4537
Third Avenue South, Minneapolis.

Can torture be justified in certain circumstances? Do "harsh interrogation
techniques" make Americans safer? Can cruel, inhuman, and degrading
treatment of prisoners be morally justified? Now that President Obama has
issued an executive order halting torture, the National Religious Campaign
Against Torture is working to build the moral consensus that torture is
always wrong. "Ending U.S.-Sponsored Torture Forever," is a new study
resource for congregations of various faiths. Discussion follows.
Sponsored by: the St. Joan of Arc/WAMM Peacemakers. FFI: Call
612-827-5364.


--------2 of 10--------

From: Jason Stone <jason.stone [at] yahoo.com>
Subject: Vs free trade/f 5.06 7pm

Movie: The Emperor's New Clothes, A Cautionary Tale of Free Trade - May 6

Celebrate World Fair Trade Day with the Sierra Club and MN Fair Trade
Coalition! Join us for a movie that exposes the costly side of "free"
trade and learn how you can be involved in creating positive change.

The Emperor's New Clothes:
A Cautionary Tale of Free Trade
Thursday, May 6
7:00pm - 8:30pm
Seward Co-op 2832 East Franklin Ave Minneapolis, MN

The Emperor's New Clothes: A Cautionary Tale of Free Trade takes an
impassioned look at the effects of economic globalization on workers in
Canada, the United States, and Mexico. Filmed over a three-year period,
the film looks at life before, during and after the signing of the North
American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA).

The movie follows a Canadian delegation of workers to Mexico to see where
some of their jobs have gone. They find the lawns in front of industrial
plants greened by sprinklers, while some Mexican workers live in cardboard
shacks without running water. It takes an incisive look at the profound
effects that economic agreements between big business and government can
have on human lives, including increased cuts to social programs, massive
unemployment, environmental damage, and demoralization.

This event is free to all!

Space is limited, so pre-registration with Customer Service (612-338-2465)
is required.


--------3 of 10--------

From: Lydia Howell <lydiahowell [at] visi.com>
Subject: Mexican/art/rev 5.06 7pm

TUNE IN to KFAI Radio's ART MATTERS Thursday May 6, 7pm to hear a
conversation with artist-curators TINA and XAVIER TAVERA talking about the
current Intermedia Arts exhibit "INDEPENDENCE & REVOLUTION:
1810/1910/2010" of Mexican artists. Guest host Lydia Howell.(more info
about exhibition below) Art Matters is on KFAI, 90.3fm Mpls 106.7 fm
St.Paul


--------4 of 10--------

From: Jane Powers <janepow [at] earthlink.net>
Subject: Shadow theater 5.06 8:30pm

A social-political tale in 3 parts over 3 evenings

Date & Time:  Thursday, May 6 at dusk (about 8:30 pm)
Place:  Mill Ruins Park (waterfront of Mill City Museum)

Date & Time:  Friday, May 7 at dusk (about 8:30 pm)
Place:  Hennepin Ave and 3rd Street

Date & Time:  Sturday, May 8 at dusk (bout 8:30 pm)
Place:  Laura Ingalls Wilder School, E 34th Street, between Chicago Ave. &
Elliot Ave.
Note:  In collaboration with Youth Projection Art Crew from Pillsbury
House

MINNEAPOLIS, MN - Puppeteers Bart Buch and Kyle Loven, Minneapolis Art on
Wheels (MAW) Artists in Residence, in collaboration with MAW researchers
Sinan Goknur and Andrea Steudel, present Shadows with No Capital: a
multiple-evening shadow projection piece that employs the cast of
characters of traditional Turkish shadow theatre and places them in new
territory, modern day Minneapolis. Visual language, shadow puppetry, video
and music combine in outdoor performances.

The story unfolds over the course of three evenings.  For the final
performance the Shadows with No Capital project collaborates with the
Youth Projection Art Crew (P.A.C).  Youth P.A.C. is a community arts
initiative led by MAW and Pillsbury House in Central Neighborhood of
Minneapolis.

Minneapolis Art on Wheels (MAW) is an artist collective dedicated to
activating public spaces with large-scale projections of sound and video.
MAW develops software, hardware and methodologies for participatory urban
projection and helps artists and community organizations utilize these
instruments to creatively claim and transform public spaces.

jane powers janepow [at] earthlink.net 612.203.3248 studio/cell 612.823.6921
home


--------5 of 10--------

From: Dennis Hill <dhill726 [at] yahoo.com>
Subject: Unallotment 5.07 8am

Center for the Study of Politics and Governance
What Now?  Consequences of Supreme Court's Unallotment Ruling

Senator Julianne Ortman (R), Senate Counsel Peter Wattson, and
Representative Ryan Winkler (DFL)//
Moderated by Lawrence Jacobs, professor, University of Minnesota
Friday, May 7
8:00-9:15 AM
Cowles Auditorium, Humphrey Institute [An often establishment venue -ed]
301 19th Ave. S., Minneapolis

The Minnesota Supreme Court's ruling, striking down Governor Tim
Pawlenty's unallotments, is an historic decision regarding the process of
budgeting with unknown consequences today and into the future.  Three key
figures in the process of lawmaking and unallotment will discuss the
immediate and longer-term consequences of the Court's decision at the
Capitol.

To request disability accommodations, please call 612-625-2530 or email
cspg [at] umn.edu <mailto:cspg [at] umn.edu>.


--------6 of 10--------

From: Lydia Howell <lydiahowell [at] visi.com>
Subject: Dirty oil 5.07 11am

Fri.May 7,11am: Catalyst/KFAI Radio
In the wake of the BP oil leak in the Gulf of Mexico, what are the clean
alternaives to oil? Tune in Friday,May 7, 11am to KFAI's CATALYST to hear
two longtime Minnesota environmentalists talk about renewable energy -
what it is and how to implement it: KEN PENTEL of ECOLOGY DEMOCRACY
NETWORK and DAN ENDERSON of the Minnesota chapter of CLEAN WATER
ACTION.Archived for 2 weeks after broadcasat on the CATALYST page at
http://www.kfai.org


--------7 of 10--------

From: Jason Stone <jason.stone [at] yahoo.com>
Subject: Cinco de Mayo 5.07 4pm

Festival: Cinco de Mayo Festival St. Paul - May 7-8
Cesar Chavez St.
May 7th, 4pm-9pm
Live music on 2 stages

May 8th, 8am-6pm
Parade at 10am (Plato St and Wabasha)

CONTACT Riverview Economic Development


--------8 of 10--------

From: Eric Angell <eric-angell [at] riseup.net>
Subject: Palestine vigil 5.07 4:15pm

The weekly vigil for the liberation of Palestine continues at the
intersection of Snelling and Summit Aves in St. Paul. The Friday demo
starts at 4:15 and ends around 5:30. There are usually extra signs
available.


--------9 of 10--------

From: Socialist Appeal <new [at] socialistappeal.org>
Subject: Joe Hill/film 5.07 7pm

Remembering Labor's Martyrs - The Ballad of Joe Hill - Friday, 7 pm,
Mayday Books (301 Cedar Ave S)

Remembering Labor's Martyrs:
The Ballad of Joe Hill
A film by Bo Widerberg

This evocative 1971 Swedish production presents a historical dramatization
of the life and death of Wobbly songwriter Joe Hill shot by a Utah firing
squad in 1915 for a murder he didn't commit.

Friday, May 7, 7:00PM
Mayday Books
301 Cedar Ave South
Minneapolis
Sponsored by Socialist Action, Workers International League and Mayday
Bookstore.

[Locally world-famous film critic Morgan Soderberg super-reccommends this
film - "Be there or be unaware!" -ed]


--------10 of 10--------

BP: Billionaire Polluter
by Amy Goodman
Wednesday, May 5, 2010
TruthDig.com

Less than a week after British Petroleum's Deepwater Horizon drilling
platform exploded in the Gulf of Mexico, killing 11 workers and unleashing
what could be the worst industrial environmental disaster in U.S. history,
the company announced more than $6 billion in profits for the first
quarter of 2010, more than doubling profits from the same period the year
before. Oil industry analyst Antonia Juhasz notes: "BP is one of the most
powerful corporations operating in the United States. Its 2009 revenues of
$327 billion are enough to rank BP as the third-largest corporation in the
country. It spends aggressively to influence U.S. policy and regulatory
oversight." The power and wealth that BP and other oil giants wield are
almost without parallel in the world, and pose a threat to the lives of
workers, to the environment and to our prospects for democracy.

Sixty years ago, BP was called the Anglo-Iranian Oil Co. (AIOC). A
popular, progressive, elected Iranian government had asked the AIOC, a
largely British-owned monopoly, to share more of its profits from Iranian
oil with the people of Iran. The AIOC refused, so Iran nationalized its
oil industry. That didn't sit well with the U.S., so the CIA organized a
coup d' etat against Prime Minister Mohammed Mossadegh. After he was
deposed, the AIOC, renamed British Petroleum, got a large part of its
monopoly back, and the Iranians got the brutal Shah of Iran imposed upon
them, planting the seeds of the 1979 Iranian revolution, the subsequent
hostage crisis and the political turmoil that besets Iran to this day.

In 2000, British Petroleum rebranded itself as BP, adopting a flowery
green-and-yellow logo, and began besieging the U.S. public with an
advertising campaign claiming it was moving "beyond petroleum." BP's
aggressive growth, outrageous profit and track record of petroleum-related
disasters paint a much different picture, however. In 2005, BP's Texas
City refinery exploded, killing 15 people and injuring 170. In 2006, a BP
pipeline in Alaska leaked 200,000 gallons of crude oil, causing what the
Environmental Protection Agency calls "the largest spill that ever
occurred on the [Alaskan] North Slope." BP was fined $60 million for the
two disasters. Then, in 2009, the Occupational Safety and Health
Administration (OSHA) fined BP an additional $87 million for the refinery
blast. Secretary of Labor Hilda Solis said: "BP has allowed hundreds of
potential hazards to continue unabated. ... Workplace safety is more than
a slogan. It's the law." BP responded by formally contesting all of OSHA's
charges.

President Barack Obama said of the Gulf of Mexico oil spill, "Let me be
clear: BP is responsible for this leak; BP will be paying the bill." Riki
Ott is not so sure. She is a marine toxicologist and former "fisherma'am"
from Alaska, and was one of the first people to respond to the 1989 Exxon
Valdez oil disaster. Exxon deployed an army of lawyers to delay and defeat
the legal claims of the people who were physically and/or financially
harmed by the Valdez spill. "What we know is that the industry does
everything it can to limit its liability," she told me.

The (Mobile, Ala.) Press-Register reported that Alabama Attorney General
Troy King told BP to "stop circulating settlement agreements among coastal
Alabamians." Apparently, BP was requiring owners of fishing boats seeking
work mitigating the spill to waive any and all rights to sue BP in the
future. Despite a BP spokesperson's pledge that the waivers would not be
enforced, the news report stated, "King said late Sunday that he was still
concerned that people would lose their right to sue by accepting
settlements from BP of up to $5,000."

Even if BP doesn't trick victims into signing away the right to sue, the
1990 Oil Pollution Act, while requiring polluters to pay the actual hard
costs of the cleanup, caps the additional financial liability of a spill
at just $75 million. Given that millions of people will be impacted by the
spill, by the loss of fisheries and tourism, and by the cascade of impacts
on related industries, $75 million is small change.

That is why Sen. Robert Menendez, D-N.J., introduced a bill to raise the
economic-damages liability cap to $10 billion, calling the bill the Big
Oil Bailout Prevention Act. Riki Ott is touring New Orleans and the Gulf
Coast, educating people about the toxic effects of the spill, and helping
them prepare for the long fight ahead to hold BP accountable.

BP will surely continue its dirty practices, fighting accountability in
the courts, in the press and on the oil-drenched beaches. BP: be prepared.

Denis Moynihan contributed research to this column.
 2010 Amy Goodman
Amy Goodman is the host of "Democracy Now!," a daily international
TV/radio news hour airing on 800 stations in North America. She was
awarded the 2008 Right Livelihood Award, dubbed the .Alternative Nobel.
prize, and received the award in the Swedish Parliament in December.


------------------------------------------------------------------------------

   - David Shove             shove001 [at] tc.umn.edu
   rhymes with clove         Progressive Calendar
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